The NBT Review 20

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Master Of Your Mind EP – Lo (Independent Release)

Starting with dramatic bass breathing and evoking the spirit of Lucy Jordan era Fathfull, the listener is presented with a full keyboard swirly urban country pop song. The title song builds intensely, a show stopping power ballad in perfect miniature.

Then a switch to the personal with whispers and steel guitar, Love never lies but lies deep in a bed or quiet regret. Its story telling that connects beautifully, simple and without artifice recalling Maria Mckee at her very best.

These are songs for unseen films, or the open road sunrise, the empty city as seen from a cold midnight cloaked mountain top.

A cowboy heartbreak, soothed sweet in ambient tenderness, fractured lullabies, the European slant on this oh so Nashville oh so WideCountry  creates a subtle entrancement, slowing time just that little bit, always a good thing.

Find out more and buy the music

http://www.myspace.com/lokivikas

Drink From The Well – South Saturn Delta (Independent Release)

The best roots music does not politely imitate, blandly recreate, or coldly catalogue. The best roots music finds a new way to live the blues, dig the dirt and sing and swim in the swamps of the now. It satisfies the old timers, and invites the timid first listener right on in.

It doesn’t clean up, polish, smooth over, smile nice and package the weight of the years into something pretty for TV. It rambles in, gets the soul a little smudged, plugs in and starts to play.

South Saturn Delta creates that type of roots music.

The album was recorded in one open space, with microphones suspended from the ceiling and as the opening track begins we are transported from our office, bedroom, and lounge to somewhere wilder. The strange comfort of a howling wind blends into the strange seduction of the blues cry. And while it is close to AGO, it is more perfectly timeless.

These are party songs for the so called poor, the people who live and die in tune with the harshness and glee of the nature around them. In these songs you can both feel the weight of the rain and the throb of the beaten up truck as it rattles into town.

Investigate further

http://www.southsaturndelta.com/

Secrets Of The Heart – Char Butler (Quantumelody Productions )

That this is a family affair is evident in the casual intimacy that slides through each song, the harmonies and the instrumentation illustrating a comfort of being able to finish the other musicians thoughts.

There is no angst here, none of the bitterness that many folk popsters mistake for honesty. The arrangements are tender and always quietly uplifting. In these songs the light that is so soothing after the dark long night, is always already creeping in, adding subtle rich nuances to what we think we know.

A lot of well crafted pop is about the surface, easily snatched emotions, spoon fed like adverts to a public that want something sweet on their way to work. This collection, though Extremely well constructed by mother, daughter and son in law, has no essence of that, rather songs created out of love and processed with a humble joy.

Find out more

http://www.charbutler.com/

hear these artists on the NBT Podcast

http://nextbigthing.libsyn.com/

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The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 14

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New Media Pioneer: Sandi of the The Lesbian Mafia Podcast

NYC based lesbian Sandi airs her personal conversations, views, and dirty
laundry, with friends/guests living locally and in other major cities
across the country.

http://thelesbianmafia.podomatic.com/
http://www.myspace.com/thelesbianmafiacast
http://twitter.com/thelesbianmafia

Q:  How long have you been broadcasting?
A:  A year and a half.

Q:  In your opinion, what does a good song need to consist of?
A: I can usually tell if I like a song within the first 10 seconds. It
should be provocative from the second I press play. Tension and release
are really important for me, and good structure makes me feel like I’m
being taken on a ride by the songwriter. Yet sometime’s I think there
really isn’t any magic formula, a good song is just a good song. One
person could love it, another person could hate it, and some songs can
cross over genre’s so it maybe it’s subjective.

Q: What is your favorite band or favorite genre of music and why?
A: I’m not wed to a certain band or genre. At different times I listen to
different styles of music for different reasons. It’s always changing and
I’m always actively on the hunt for new sounds.

Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have affected
you most?
A: The Fairness Doctrine is like a black crow squawking outside the
window threatening death to Freedom of Speech. It’s target is talk radio
but the Internet would logically be their next target. Also the fact that
the music industry treats everyone on the Internet like we are pirates has
created a really unfriendly environment and it’s very unfortunate.
Traditional radio has felt the effects of our media and they are coming
online to get ideas from US to see what WE are doing. They’re trying to
keep up with us because they are the ones who have felt the impact of what
we are doing, a lot of their advertisers are coming online.
One person owns like 1000 radio stations and that is what ruined the music
industry, yet there is still this idea that radio is the only respectable
way to get your music out there. How does it hurt an artist if I am
introducing or reminding my niche audience about their music? Why make it
difficult for us to get your music heard? I don’t have time to seek
everyone out and get their permission to play music. Why create dissension
with people/fans in a unique position to help you?  Guitar Hero has
effectively communicated the right message by charging record labels to
play their artists music in their video games, effectively turning the
tables.

Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in
generating album sales, do you feel podcasts have that power?
A: A lot of musicians have Myspace to thank for their careers. They have
done so much for the music industry. It’s an incredibly effective
marketing tool, but it’s over-saturated. A lot of people have their
Myspace page set to NOT accept band requests. Many people will only add
bands they already like. If I play an artists music on my show, that is
free advertising and the ultimate show of support, because no one is
telling me I have to play it. I think a good portion of  more savvy
attentive people are starting to realize that because I get MP3’s from
musicians pretty often now.

The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 13

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New Media Pioneer: Kevin Breuner of the CD Baby Podcast

 

Kevin is a podcaster, blogger, and sync licensing agent.He resides in Portland, OR where he developed and maintains the podcasting and sync licensing efforts for CD Baby.

 

Podcast – http://cdbabypodcast.com

Blog – http://kevinbreuner.com

Twitter – kbreuner

 

Q: How long has the CD Baby Podcast been broadcasting?

 

A: Our first episode of the DIY Musician Podcast posted back in May 2007, so we have been podcasting for a year and a half.

 

Q: What do you try to acheive with each podcast?

 

With each episode, I’m always asking myself, “What can artists learn from this episode. Does this create discussion around topics that are really valuable to the indie music community?” Those questions are bouncing around in my head from the beginning to the end of an episodes production. I think with a podcast or blog, it’s incredibly important to stick to the intended purpose, and because of that, there are interviews that were never released. When it came down to it, they didn’t serve the purpose we want to achieve with the podcast. Ultimately, I hope that each episode continues to empower artists to take their music career into their own hands and make some realistic steps forward.

 

Q: What is the main goal of the CD Baby Podcast?

 

A: My goal with the podcast was to create an “honest” straight forward resource that CD Baby artists and the indie music community at large could use to help move their career forward. I always enjoy talking to other artists and musicians(I’m an artist as well!), and throughout my time at CD Baby, I’ve talked to thousands of artist that are trying to breakthrough with their music. What surprises me, is how many artists, both newbies and seasoned veterans alike, fall into the same traps over and over again.

 

Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have effected you most?

 

A: So far, podcasting has remained relatively untouched. There are quite a few podcasts that play mainstream music (that has not been properly licensed), and I think we’ll start seeing the major labels take an interest in cracking down on the usage of that content. But the beauty of the podcast and the invention of the RSS feed, is that you can have direct access to people who are interested in what you are saying. There is no gate keeper telling you what you can and can’t do.

 

Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in generating album sales, do you feel podcasts have that power?

 

A: I do, and I’m actually surprised that more bands aren’t using podcasting to help promote their music. We actually interviewed a band that released a podcast before they even had all their members. The podcast chronicled their journey as they found the final member and wrote songs, recorded and so on. It immediately caught the attention of the folks over in the iTunes podcast section, and the band’s podcast received a front page feature before they had even played a show. By the time they had all their members and started playing out, people were coming out wearing the bands t-shirts they were selling through their website. The fans really felt a connection to the band. I will say though, for a band to have a podcast that builds their fan base, it must have a couple key components. 1. It must have a point – It can’t be people goofing off in front of a mic or telling inside jokes 2. It must draw the listener into the bands story – Save the shameless self promotion(They probably already are a fan) and give them the real you. 3. It has to be consistent – quite possibly the hardest part. Nobody will be interested in it if you do one episode every couple months. I’m actually in a new band here in Portland, and we have a podcast in the works. We’ve spent so much time really trying to define what it will be and how it will work just to make sure that it becomes a part of what we do. If we just made a random haphazard stab at it, it would be doomed from the beginning.

 

The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 12

arieljan1

New Media Pioneer: Erik Sturm of Bohemio Radio

 

Bohemio Radio is a listener supported radio station for independent artists around the world. They know what it is like for an artist to promote their music, while trying to maintain a creative flow. Now they can express themselves through independent radio without all the hang ups.

 

http://bohemioradio.com

http://myspace.com/bohemioradio.com

 

Q: How long have you been broadcasting?

A: Bohemio Radio has been broadcasting since December of 2007

 

Q: In your opinion, what does a good song need to consist of?

A: A simple melodic progression, accompanied by harmony, rhythm, & soul.

 

Q: What is your favorite band or favorite genre of music and why?

A: I prefer music that has not been scathed by the commercial mainstream. Genres like food keep the menu interesting as all palatable substances have their place in time.

 

Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have affected you most?

A: Performance rights fees and the FCC

 

Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in generating album sales, do you feel podcasts have that power?

A: MySpace is a wonderful platform for marketing; however it requires extended effort from the artist to promote their successes. In a information hungry society with little time or none at all, a podcast can supply you with the extended entertainment at minimal efforts.

 

The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 11

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New Media Pioneer: Andrea Zuniga of Geek is Chic Podcast

http://www.geekischic.org

 

A podcast where technology is fashionable and practical!

 

Q: How long have you been broadcasting?

A: I am very excited to be fast approaching the one year anniversary of my Podcast! The first Episode of Geek Is Chic was released January 31, 2008. I recently just launched a new podcast called Daily Quote Podcast. That one has been in production for almost a month.

 

Q: In your opinion, what does a good song need to consist of?

A: A good song for me captures your attention with a good beat, but is forever engraved into you with lyrics that connect and move you.

 

Q: What is your favorite band or favorite genre of music and why?

A: Although it may sound cliche, I have an incredibly eclectic tastes in music. My iPhone is proof of just that. You can find reggaeton and hip hop, jazz and soul, and really, everything in between. I genuinely feel that there is both good and bad every genre. The important thing is being open minded enough to connect with an amazing song. So I really don’t like to say I have a favorite genre. I love good music, wherever I can find it!

 

Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have effected you most?

A: I think the fact that mainstream artists and the record industry are so protective of the use of their content has for me been a blessing in disguise. I have fallen in love with Podsafe artists. Thanks to fellow podcasters and Ariel Publicity I have discovered some of my favorite new music. The best part is that I can feel free to share with my listeners.

 

Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in generating album sales, do you feel podcasts have that power?

A: I wholeheartedly believe that Podcasts have an incredible power in generating album sales. It has been my personal experience that since I’ve been signing off with music at the end of every show, I ALWAYS get a couple dozen inquiries about the artists I played. I think the reason why it works is quite simple. Since the song recommendation is coming from a trusted source, listeners don’t feel they’re being pitched at. That trust your audience has in you not only makes them take the reccomendation to heart, but since already have a a built in rapport, they feel comfortable enough to ask you where to purchase the music, or find out more about the bands or artist.