The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 17


Adam Hiniker

EarCandy New York

Q:  How long have you been broadcasting/blogging?

We created Ear Candy about a year ago and recorded shows sporadically for the first nine months. It was just December that we started doing a weekly show.

Q:  In your opinion, what does a good song need to consist of?

In my opinion it has to have an edge or some very apparent emotion behind it. I don’t necessarily think a song has to be cutting edge or innovative to be great (though it helps) as long as an artist shows skill in their craft and confidence in how they deliver it.

Q: What is your favorite band or favorite genre of music and why?

The genre I listen to the most is hip hop, it’s an extremely raw form of expression considering the overhead is very minimal and  so much can be said in just sixteen bars of a hip hop verse. I grew up listening to hip hop and always liked it for superficial reasons but in the early nineties I discovered their were acts out there that wrote about things I could actually relate to and that’s when I started getting ideas about producing music.

Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have effected you most?

With all of the podsafe music resources and the fact that most artists and labels are more than willing to let us play their music these types of changes haven’t affected us much.

Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in generating album sales, do you feel that that is a true statement?

Yes, I think their is a lot of random solicitation on myspace, however when someone blogs about an artist or album it’s a form of reference for the reader who generally values the bloggers opinion. Blogging is a great form of promotion for artists and also gives music fans an opportunity to be a journalist, I think this drives sales in a way that making mix tapes used to but on a much larger scale.

The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 16


New Media Pioneer: Pete Cogle, one of the podcasters at the Association Of Music Podcasting

Host of  the PC Podcast, featuring eclectic music from around the world: and

The Dub Zone, featuring the very best dub reggae: and

PCP{2}, a deeper look into the musical genres explored in PC Podcast:


Plus he is the co-host of

Made In The UK, featuring some of the very best UK music, for the world:

AMPed, the weekly digest of the Association of Music Podcasting at:

Q: How can a podcaster become a part of Association of Music Podcasting (AMP)?


Firstly, you need to have produced at least 5 episodes of your podcast. We want to make sure you don’t “podfade” after your first couple of episodes.  Secondly, all of the music must be podsafe. AMP is about the music that doesn’t get airplay on mainstream radio. Unless artists have specifically made some of their music podsafe, we can’t play it.  We also charge a small membership fee, which helps with hosting and other activities.


Most importantly you need to be good at podcasting. Before becoming a member, your podcast will be peer reviewed. We take into consideration the podcaster’s passion about their music, their broadcasting style, the quality of their broadcasting equipment, the quality of the music they play and even the sample rate they create the podcast at.  Not everyone makes the grade.


Q: What is the background story on how AMP came about? 


AMP’s history goes back to late 2004, long before I joined. Chris MacDonald, Derrick Oien, Bob Goyetche and Jason Evangelho all had important parts to play in setting up the association long before podcasting became a mainstream term.  Back then, Apple was reluctant to accept music podcasts into their iTunes store, because they were worried about licensed music being freely distributed under their umbrella.  AMP became the first association to offer Apple a “safe harbour” knowing that AMP member’s podcasts would be podsafe. AMP was also the first association to offer episodic downloadable media, and start creating a library of music. This library later went on to become a profit-making enterprise as the Podsafe Music Network.

AMP was, and remains, a non-profit making association, and after a hiatus in mid 2005, George Smyth got things moving again. After revamping the website and building some tools to automate the process of making a collective podcast, the AMPed podcast became a weekly event in the podosphere.

I joined the association in March 2006 and have been a regular contributor since then.  Like many new members, initially I just submitted tracks to be played on AMPed, and occasionally became the host.  More recently I’ve taken over a few more duties, like webmaster and membership secretary.  Now many of the members have regular roles maintaining the podcast feed, making sure we all submit music on time, organizing the host rota and hosting the show.  Everyone gets to do as much as they want to do. We’re a good team.


The best thing about the association is that we all have a voice. We’ve had some great suggestions from new members and old members alike and we keep moving forward.


Q: How do you go about choosing which shows to feature on


Each podcaster can submit a track to AMPed each week.  If everyone submitted a track the show would be 3 hours long, but we generally get enough submissions to fill a 40-60 minute show. It’s entirely up to the podcaster which tracks they want to play, but as they have only one track to chose, it means AMPed ends up being the best of the best. AMPed is also work and child safe.


The week’s host is the final arbiter of what tracks make the show, and the running order. All the hosts have a different style and like different kinds of music, so it’s as much of a journey of discovery for them as it is for the listeners. I’m sure some of the hosts groan when I’ve submitted a track sung in Russian or Cambodian, but hey, I like that stuff, and I think the listeners deserve to hear it. You don’t hear that on mainstream radio!


Q: How does AMP keep changing?


Every new podcaster brings a new perspective on how to promote their podcast and their favourite music. We have members who really understand Search Engine Optimization (SEO), and we’ve completely revamped out website, to pull in all the latest information from our member’s blogs and podcasts, straight to our front page.


We have other members who are really passionate about social networking, be that via Facebook, Myspace or  We’ve recently started using Twitter to publicize when we have new podcasts available, and we’re looking at using Twiturm to “tweet” podcast “samplers” of the shows out to people on the move.


We also want to hear what our listeners have to say, so we’ve created a survey on the main page of our website They can tell us what they think of the show, what we do right, and what we should be doing better.



Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have affected any podcasters being able to air their music?


Back in 2004, there were no clear guidelines, but, as I mentioned, Apple were worried about allowing music podcasts into the iTunes store, especially after the legal ruling in the case.  Because all AMP podcasts were vouched podsafe, this gave Apple the solution they needed and all the AMP member podcasts were approved.


Since then, many content laws and broadcasting rights have been suggested, and these vary from country to country. AMP has always been international and we have podcasters based in the US, Canada, UK, Germany, Portugal, Australia and even Nepal, so it’s not easy to see which rules would apply. There are also more stringent rules for streaming services, than there are for podcast downloads, but as long as we keep within our guidelines of using podsafe music, we can continue producing podcasts.


Today there are a large number of resources that podcasters can use to get podsafe or Creative Commons licensed music, such as IODA Promonet, Magnatune, Jamendo and Music SUBMIT as well as the Podsafe Music Network, and, of course, Ariel Publicity.  We also get music from other sources such as Myspace, and from the artists directly, but we do need to make sure the artist, manager, or label gives us permission first. Ariel Publicity is a great service for us, because we know all the hard work has been done beforehand and we can legally play the music.


Of course, nowadays everyone knows what a podcast is. When AMP first started, artists were quite unsure of our motives or even what a podcast was.  It’s great to see some of the big artists like, Tom Waits, Bloc Party, Nick Cave or the Manic Street Preachers leading the way and making some tracks podsafe. This encourages up and coming artists to do the same.


Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in generating album sales, do you feel that podcasts will have the same effect as well?


Absolutely!  I wear a T-shirt that says “Podcasting Is Selling Music” and another one of our members talks about “Promotion Not Piracy”. 


Myspace is great for artists to allow listeners to hear their music, but the listener has to go searching if they want to find something new.  If you find a podcast that you like, you can let the podcaster be your guide. We’ve all heard from listeners that they’ve bought an album that they never expected to like because they’ve heard it first on a podcast. 


I’ve played bands back in 2006 that none of my friends had heard of, and now they’re playing the main stage of the largest festivals in Europe. OK, that’s not all down to podcasting, but it’s part of the process. Mainstream radio only picks up on bands when they have a major record deal. Podcasters are playing the music months, even years before then.


If you want to hear something you’ve heard before by the Beatles or the Eagles, then feel free to go to Myspace or listen to mainstream radio. If you really want to hear something really new; something recorded this year, recorded yesterday, something that’s not even finished yet – then listen to a podcast!




The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 15


New Media Pioneer: Joel Gaines of the Joel Gaines Show and Internet Radio Magazine


Internet Radio Magazine reports on trends happening online in the Internet Radio space. They feature an artist every week.


Q: How long have you been broadcasting/blogging?

A: I was a political blogger for 8 years before I became a broadcaster. We’ve been broadcasting The Joel Gaines Show for just over a year. Because of our experience with Ariel Publicity and the artists we’ve interacted with, we have decided to revitalize Internet Radio Magazine dot com as a more music-based property.

Q: In your opinion, what does a good song need to consist of?

A: For me to gravitate to a specific song, I have to feel it. I’m not saying I have to be able to relate to the song topic, but I do have to feel like it’s not contrived. Artists who are investing more than time into a track tend to come across more passionately. That’s what I look for.

Q: What is your favorite band or favorite genre of music and why?

A: I have to admit my favorite genre is 70’s funk and my favorite band is Journey. Having travelled to nearly 30 countries, I have picked up an appreciation for just about everything. Shuffling my music player might find Hazel O’Connor, Crossfade, G Tom Mac, and George Straight played one after the other.

Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have affected you most?

A: I have broadcast under a station license and as an individual internet broadcaster. Trying to stay in license compliance and keeping your music fresh can be price prohibitive for the little guys. I really enjoy the podsafe offering from the fantastic artists Ariel Publicity promotes.

Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in generating album sales, do you feel that that is a true statement?

A: I think it is true. A blogger has more specific opportunities to attract traffic and it is easier to be a big fish in a niche pond. On Myspace, no matter what you are trying promote, you are faced with being just another fish in the ocean. I’ve seen social media work for people when they use it as a means to bring traffic to their blog, but it needs to be looked at more as just another tool in the kit.


The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 14


New Media Pioneer: Sandi of the The Lesbian Mafia Podcast

NYC based lesbian Sandi airs her personal conversations, views, and dirty
laundry, with friends/guests living locally and in other major cities
across the country.

Q:  How long have you been broadcasting?
A:  A year and a half.

Q:  In your opinion, what does a good song need to consist of?
A: I can usually tell if I like a song within the first 10 seconds. It
should be provocative from the second I press play. Tension and release
are really important for me, and good structure makes me feel like I’m
being taken on a ride by the songwriter. Yet sometime’s I think there
really isn’t any magic formula, a good song is just a good song. One
person could love it, another person could hate it, and some songs can
cross over genre’s so it maybe it’s subjective.

Q: What is your favorite band or favorite genre of music and why?
A: I’m not wed to a certain band or genre. At different times I listen to
different styles of music for different reasons. It’s always changing and
I’m always actively on the hunt for new sounds.

Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have affected
you most?
A: The Fairness Doctrine is like a black crow squawking outside the
window threatening death to Freedom of Speech. It’s target is talk radio
but the Internet would logically be their next target. Also the fact that
the music industry treats everyone on the Internet like we are pirates has
created a really unfriendly environment and it’s very unfortunate.
Traditional radio has felt the effects of our media and they are coming
online to get ideas from US to see what WE are doing. They’re trying to
keep up with us because they are the ones who have felt the impact of what
we are doing, a lot of their advertisers are coming online.
One person owns like 1000 radio stations and that is what ruined the music
industry, yet there is still this idea that radio is the only respectable
way to get your music out there. How does it hurt an artist if I am
introducing or reminding my niche audience about their music? Why make it
difficult for us to get your music heard? I don’t have time to seek
everyone out and get their permission to play music. Why create dissension
with people/fans in a unique position to help you?  Guitar Hero has
effectively communicated the right message by charging record labels to
play their artists music in their video games, effectively turning the

Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in
generating album sales, do you feel podcasts have that power?
A: A lot of musicians have Myspace to thank for their careers. They have
done so much for the music industry. It’s an incredibly effective
marketing tool, but it’s over-saturated. A lot of people have their
Myspace page set to NOT accept band requests. Many people will only add
bands they already like. If I play an artists music on my show, that is
free advertising and the ultimate show of support, because no one is
telling me I have to play it. I think a good portion of  more savvy
attentive people are starting to realize that because I get MP3’s from
musicians pretty often now.

The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 13


New Media Pioneer: Kevin Breuner of the CD Baby Podcast


Kevin is a podcaster, blogger, and sync licensing agent.He resides in Portland, OR where he developed and maintains the podcasting and sync licensing efforts for CD Baby.


Podcast –

Blog –

Twitter – kbreuner


Q: How long has the CD Baby Podcast been broadcasting?


A: Our first episode of the DIY Musician Podcast posted back in May 2007, so we have been podcasting for a year and a half.


Q: What do you try to acheive with each podcast?


With each episode, I’m always asking myself, “What can artists learn from this episode. Does this create discussion around topics that are really valuable to the indie music community?” Those questions are bouncing around in my head from the beginning to the end of an episodes production. I think with a podcast or blog, it’s incredibly important to stick to the intended purpose, and because of that, there are interviews that were never released. When it came down to it, they didn’t serve the purpose we want to achieve with the podcast. Ultimately, I hope that each episode continues to empower artists to take their music career into their own hands and make some realistic steps forward.


Q: What is the main goal of the CD Baby Podcast?


A: My goal with the podcast was to create an “honest” straight forward resource that CD Baby artists and the indie music community at large could use to help move their career forward. I always enjoy talking to other artists and musicians(I’m an artist as well!), and throughout my time at CD Baby, I’ve talked to thousands of artist that are trying to breakthrough with their music. What surprises me, is how many artists, both newbies and seasoned veterans alike, fall into the same traps over and over again.


Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have effected you most?


A: So far, podcasting has remained relatively untouched. There are quite a few podcasts that play mainstream music (that has not been properly licensed), and I think we’ll start seeing the major labels take an interest in cracking down on the usage of that content. But the beauty of the podcast and the invention of the RSS feed, is that you can have direct access to people who are interested in what you are saying. There is no gate keeper telling you what you can and can’t do.


Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in generating album sales, do you feel podcasts have that power?


A: I do, and I’m actually surprised that more bands aren’t using podcasting to help promote their music. We actually interviewed a band that released a podcast before they even had all their members. The podcast chronicled their journey as they found the final member and wrote songs, recorded and so on. It immediately caught the attention of the folks over in the iTunes podcast section, and the band’s podcast received a front page feature before they had even played a show. By the time they had all their members and started playing out, people were coming out wearing the bands t-shirts they were selling through their website. The fans really felt a connection to the band. I will say though, for a band to have a podcast that builds their fan base, it must have a couple key components. 1. It must have a point – It can’t be people goofing off in front of a mic or telling inside jokes 2. It must draw the listener into the bands story – Save the shameless self promotion(They probably already are a fan) and give them the real you. 3. It has to be consistent – quite possibly the hardest part. Nobody will be interested in it if you do one episode every couple months. I’m actually in a new band here in Portland, and we have a podcast in the works. We’ve spent so much time really trying to define what it will be and how it will work just to make sure that it becomes a part of what we do. If we just made a random haphazard stab at it, it would be doomed from the beginning.


The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 12


New Media Pioneer: Erik Sturm of Bohemio Radio


Bohemio Radio is a listener supported radio station for independent artists around the world. They know what it is like for an artist to promote their music, while trying to maintain a creative flow. Now they can express themselves through independent radio without all the hang ups.


Q: How long have you been broadcasting?

A: Bohemio Radio has been broadcasting since December of 2007


Q: In your opinion, what does a good song need to consist of?

A: A simple melodic progression, accompanied by harmony, rhythm, & soul.


Q: What is your favorite band or favorite genre of music and why?

A: I prefer music that has not been scathed by the commercial mainstream. Genres like food keep the menu interesting as all palatable substances have their place in time.


Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have affected you most?

A: Performance rights fees and the FCC


Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in generating album sales, do you feel podcasts have that power?

A: MySpace is a wonderful platform for marketing; however it requires extended effort from the artist to promote their successes. In a information hungry society with little time or none at all, a podcast can supply you with the extended entertainment at minimal efforts.


The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 11


New Media Pioneer: Andrea Zuniga of Geek is Chic Podcast


A podcast where technology is fashionable and practical!


Q: How long have you been broadcasting?

A: I am very excited to be fast approaching the one year anniversary of my Podcast! The first Episode of Geek Is Chic was released January 31, 2008. I recently just launched a new podcast called Daily Quote Podcast. That one has been in production for almost a month.


Q: In your opinion, what does a good song need to consist of?

A: A good song for me captures your attention with a good beat, but is forever engraved into you with lyrics that connect and move you.


Q: What is your favorite band or favorite genre of music and why?

A: Although it may sound cliche, I have an incredibly eclectic tastes in music. My iPhone is proof of just that. You can find reggaeton and hip hop, jazz and soul, and really, everything in between. I genuinely feel that there is both good and bad every genre. The important thing is being open minded enough to connect with an amazing song. So I really don’t like to say I have a favorite genre. I love good music, wherever I can find it!


Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have effected you most?

A: I think the fact that mainstream artists and the record industry are so protective of the use of their content has for me been a blessing in disguise. I have fallen in love with Podsafe artists. Thanks to fellow podcasters and Ariel Publicity I have discovered some of my favorite new music. The best part is that I can feel free to share with my listeners.


Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in generating album sales, do you feel podcasts have that power?

A: I wholeheartedly believe that Podcasts have an incredible power in generating album sales. It has been my personal experience that since I’ve been signing off with music at the end of every show, I ALWAYS get a couple dozen inquiries about the artists I played. I think the reason why it works is quite simple. Since the song recommendation is coming from a trusted source, listeners don’t feel they’re being pitched at. That trust your audience has in you not only makes them take the reccomendation to heart, but since already have a a built in rapport, they feel comfortable enough to ask you where to purchase the music, or find out more about the bands or artist.