The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 16

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New Media Pioneer: Pete Cogle, one of the podcasters at the Association Of Music Podcasting

Host of  the PC Podcast, featuring eclectic music from around the world: http://pcpodcast.blogsome.com and

The Dub Zone, featuring the very best dub reggae: http://thedubzone.blogsome.com and

PCP{2}, a deeper look into the musical genres explored in PC Podcast: http://pcp2.blogsome.com

 

Plus he is the co-host of

Made In The UK, featuring some of the very best UK music, for the world: http://madeintheukshow.co.uk

AMPed, the weekly digest of the Association of Music Podcasting at: http://musicpodcasting.org

Q: How can a podcaster become a part of Association of Music Podcasting (AMP)?

 

Firstly, you need to have produced at least 5 episodes of your podcast. We want to make sure you don’t “podfade” after your first couple of episodes.  Secondly, all of the music must be podsafe. AMP is about the music that doesn’t get airplay on mainstream radio. Unless artists have specifically made some of their music podsafe, we can’t play it.  We also charge a small membership fee, which helps with hosting and other activities.

 

Most importantly you need to be good at podcasting. Before becoming a member, your podcast will be peer reviewed. We take into consideration the podcaster’s passion about their music, their broadcasting style, the quality of their broadcasting equipment, the quality of the music they play and even the sample rate they create the podcast at.  Not everyone makes the grade.

 

Q: What is the background story on how AMP came about? 

 

AMP’s history goes back to late 2004, long before I joined. Chris MacDonald, Derrick Oien, Bob Goyetche and Jason Evangelho all had important parts to play in setting up the association long before podcasting became a mainstream term.  Back then, Apple was reluctant to accept music podcasts into their iTunes store, because they were worried about licensed music being freely distributed under their umbrella.  AMP became the first association to offer Apple a “safe harbour” knowing that AMP member’s podcasts would be podsafe. AMP was also the first association to offer episodic downloadable media, and start creating a library of music. This library later went on to become a profit-making enterprise as the Podsafe Music Network.

AMP was, and remains, a non-profit making association, and after a hiatus in mid 2005, George Smyth got things moving again. After revamping the website and building some tools to automate the process of making a collective podcast, the AMPed podcast became a weekly event in the podosphere.

I joined the association in March 2006 and have been a regular contributor since then.  Like many new members, initially I just submitted tracks to be played on AMPed, and occasionally became the host.  More recently I’ve taken over a few more duties, like webmaster and membership secretary.  Now many of the members have regular roles maintaining the podcast feed, making sure we all submit music on time, organizing the host rota and hosting the show.  Everyone gets to do as much as they want to do. We’re a good team.

 

The best thing about the association is that we all have a voice. We’ve had some great suggestions from new members and old members alike and we keep moving forward.

 

Q: How do you go about choosing which shows to feature on http://amped.musicpodcasting.org/?

 

Each podcaster can submit a track to AMPed each week.  If everyone submitted a track the show would be 3 hours long, but we generally get enough submissions to fill a 40-60 minute show. It’s entirely up to the podcaster which tracks they want to play, but as they have only one track to chose, it means AMPed ends up being the best of the best. AMPed is also work and child safe.

 

The week’s host is the final arbiter of what tracks make the show, and the running order. All the hosts have a different style and like different kinds of music, so it’s as much of a journey of discovery for them as it is for the listeners. I’m sure some of the hosts groan when I’ve submitted a track sung in Russian or Cambodian, but hey, I like that stuff, and I think the listeners deserve to hear it. You don’t hear that on mainstream radio!

 

Q: How does AMP keep changing?

 

Every new podcaster brings a new perspective on how to promote their podcast and their favourite music. We have members who really understand Search Engine Optimization (SEO), and we’ve completely revamped out website, http://musicpodcasting.org to pull in all the latest information from our member’s blogs and podcasts, straight to our front page.

 

We have other members who are really passionate about social networking, be that via Facebook, Myspace or last.fm.  We’ve recently started using Twitter to publicize when we have new podcasts available, and we’re looking at using Twiturm to “tweet” podcast “samplers” of the shows out to people on the move.

 

We also want to hear what our listeners have to say, so we’ve created a survey on the main page of our website http://musicpodcasting.org. They can tell us what they think of the show, what we do right, and what we should be doing better.

 

 

Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have affected any podcasters being able to air their music?

 

Back in 2004, there were no clear guidelines, but, as I mentioned, Apple were worried about allowing music podcasts into the iTunes store, especially after the legal ruling in the MyMP3.com case.  Because all AMP podcasts were vouched podsafe, this gave Apple the solution they needed and all the AMP member podcasts were approved.

 

Since then, many content laws and broadcasting rights have been suggested, and these vary from country to country. AMP has always been international and we have podcasters based in the US, Canada, UK, Germany, Portugal, Australia and even Nepal, so it’s not easy to see which rules would apply. There are also more stringent rules for streaming services, than there are for podcast downloads, but as long as we keep within our guidelines of using podsafe music, we can continue producing podcasts.

 

Today there are a large number of resources that podcasters can use to get podsafe or Creative Commons licensed music, such as IODA Promonet, Magnatune, Jamendo and Music SUBMIT as well as the Podsafe Music Network, and, of course, Ariel Publicity.  We also get music from other sources such as Myspace, last.fm and from the artists directly, but we do need to make sure the artist, manager, or label gives us permission first. Ariel Publicity is a great service for us, because we know all the hard work has been done beforehand and we can legally play the music.

 

Of course, nowadays everyone knows what a podcast is. When AMP first started, artists were quite unsure of our motives or even what a podcast was.  It’s great to see some of the big artists like, Tom Waits, Bloc Party, Nick Cave or the Manic Street Preachers leading the way and making some tracks podsafe. This encourages up and coming artists to do the same.

 

Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in generating album sales, do you feel that podcasts will have the same effect as well?

 

Absolutely!  I wear a T-shirt that says “Podcasting Is Selling Music” and another one of our members talks about “Promotion Not Piracy”. 

 

Myspace is great for artists to allow listeners to hear their music, but the listener has to go searching if they want to find something new.  If you find a podcast that you like, you can let the podcaster be your guide. We’ve all heard from listeners that they’ve bought an album that they never expected to like because they’ve heard it first on a podcast. 

 

I’ve played bands back in 2006 that none of my friends had heard of, and now they’re playing the main stage of the largest festivals in Europe. OK, that’s not all down to podcasting, but it’s part of the process. Mainstream radio only picks up on bands when they have a major record deal. Podcasters are playing the music months, even years before then.

 

If you want to hear something you’ve heard before by the Beatles or the Eagles, then feel free to go to Myspace or listen to mainstream radio. If you really want to hear something really new; something recorded this year, recorded yesterday, something that’s not even finished yet – then listen to a podcast!

 

 

 

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The NBT Music Columns : The CyberPR Blog (Ariel Publicity)16

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This will be the last Column from Trevor for a while as he takes leave to wander the world and conduct his very own music tourism

. Man Behind The Monitor: Norvell Molex Jr  and The Jazz Suite


Trevor:  The Jazz Suite states to listeners, “It is guaranteed you will hear music that you never heard before.” What do you do to ensure this?

Norvell:  With the Internet become a main part of life and business finding music became an adventure! There is so much music out there between established and un established artist’s that it is incredible!! I mean the Internet has exposed me to jazz artists in Italy, France, Indonesia, Spain, and Lisbon just to name a few countries. With the world as your source for new music it is not that hard to guarantee that you can play something that your listening audience has not heard before. I personally have a Love for music that has been with me since childhood so Podcasting is a natural fit for me.      


T:  Where do you find your music for the show?

N:  We find the music every where …. We get some from you guys Ariel Publicity, and Myspace.com, GraggeBand.com, Broad jam, Airplay Direct, small internet driven labels like Blue Canoe Records, direct contact with the artists, or there manager’s. The music business is in such a traumatic time it is a time for growth and change I would call the music industry the eternal child for it never grows up, but it is always learning and evolving.

 T:  How has your experience with hosting on MyPodcasts.net been? Would you recommend in to an aspiring podcaster?

N:  We have been truly blessed because I started at this as a novice, but because of Mypodcasts.net it’s truly been educational. Jeff Dyson the owner has been remarkable. I just recently recommended Mypodcasts.net to someone who wanted to start a podcast. The rates a reasonable and there are constant improvements to better your experience with the service.

T:  You’re also found on TheJazzSuite.net, where else can we find your show?

N:  Not to boast, but when we creating this show we took a day or two and saturated as many Podcast Directories as I could!!!!!! It worked I also had to concentrate on the presentation I want the listener to enjoy what the hear because they are taking there precious spare time to listen to what I’ve been blessed to do. Back to the main question I’m on Ski Valley Radio British Columbia, and 95 Laser in France, We have an Ok listing in Google, and other search engines.


T:  You were also featured in Podcast User Magazine talking about Podcasting and Jazz, for our readers who haven’t read the article, what was the essential point you were trying to convey?

N:  Writing that article gave me a chance to express my thoughts in two areas of which I have contention with the music industry and how jazz is represented. If you look at music today the battle’s that are being fought are over information! That’s right Information no longer do we allow company’s to tell us what we like via the internet we go out and find it. The article really focuses on how jazz has not been allowed to grow like other musical segments; I tried to chip away at the stereotypes associated with jazz. My goal was not to talk down to the reader, but create a hunger to find the different segments of music that have sprung from the seed’s planted by jazz. Like any other music jazz holds history, memories, and future dreams yet to be played here is my definition of jazz:   

“I will say that jazz to me is a “musical metaphor for what we wish to say and what we can’t say in life. As the melodic tones dance through our ears we inter pit a verbal response for a musical emotion. –Norvell A. Molex Jr.”

 

To read Norvell’s full article at Podcast User Magazine, go to:

http://www.podcastusermagazine.com/ issue 21

 

To catch the latest show visit:

thejazzsuite.mypodcasts.net

The NBT Music Columns : The CyberPR Blog (Ariel Publicity)12

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The Technological Challenge with Ajay Chandriani

By Trevor Dye When you’re submerged in the world of technology, it all seems to come second nature, but what if it didn’t?  There’s a constant debate about the rapid technological advancements in our society and how fast we can adapt.  Recently, we asked Ajay Chandriani of Mixed Bag Sound System to share his views on the state of the change.

 What was your reason behind starting Mixed Bag Sound System?

 

I needed an outlet for my stressful job that involved recruiting people for one of the top three search engines. I don’t sing, paint (except for some weird computer art), or play any instruments (I put those away decades ago) so the options for an outlet were limited. Playing music everyday (CD or radio in the car) alleviated my stress to a certain degree, but not enough to soothe the nerves. To make matters worse, regular radio was boring, repetitive, limited to stars and their hits, and didn’t have enough new music to introduce to the masses. It felt like a waste of time and a total rip-off for the listener who was/is looking for something fresh to put in the ears. How many times can you listen to ‘Stairway to Heaven’ – come on, a band like Led Zeppelin has more in it’s catalog than that one track, or a couple of its other hits. You get the idea. That’s how it is with all other bands that are popular. Injustice to the listener (and artist) is what I call it considering the amount of good unheard music there is in the marketplace. Unheard also applies to the vast catalog of songs by popular bands that never get played. I was terribly fed-up with the broadcast state of affairs and turned OFF the darn radio in disgust. Imagine turning on the radio to one of your favorite preset stations and knowing what the next song was going to be on the playlist, or knowing the artists that got repeated everyday, every hour, every minute. What a bloody wash!!!

 How did it get started? 

I met up with a friend from my dot com past one day and he reminded me about my dream of being a DJ, my vast music collection that I could introduce to the masses, and a little broadcast site from our early days that was now one of the big boys of Internet radio – http://www.live365.com. I remember, the day this site launched I was absolutely elated with the concept of the everyday little guy having control over his own little radio station and playlist. I was thrilled beyond words, but had to shelve this in the dark corners of my mind due to time constraints in the real world of getting a dot com newcomer up and running. Anyway, fast forward about six years, I’m stressing, meeting a buddy for lunch, he reminds me of this shelved dream, I go home and check out the site, fork over the subscription, and launch as Mixed Bag Sound System in March 2006. Don’t make a dime from this venture (wish I could), but I’m happy as a clam getting music out to listeners in over 40 countries and counting. Thanks to Ariel Publicity for contacting me and introducing me to tons of new bands and sounds (no, I’m not getting paid for this plug), and my listeners the world over thank you. I am so darn happy playing music I own and like, and I know my listeners love what they’re hearing. You will hear Led Zeppelin on my station, but it won’t be ‘Stairway……….’ I rest my case.

 Do you consider yourself tech savvy overall? 

Yes, completely and totally. I asked my son the other day if he knew how to play a record, and he was clueless. What more can I say. I come from the era of the record player. My house even had one of those wind-up Gramophones that played 78rpm’s, although that belonged to my granddad. I have seen all the technologies (records, eight track, cassettes, Walkman, CD, etc.) evolve through my lifetime and I have bought and used every one of them including the current favorite, the iPod. Our generation has been very fortunate to experience the birth and growth of various technologies through the past few decades, and we have grown alongside them. Tech savvy, you bet!!!!

 What do you think it takes to be tech savvy in today’s world and what are some of the key components of that skill set (like what are the most important things to know to get by I guess)? 

Tech savvy really applies to the older generation, and I stated my case in the previous question. We had to grow with each new technological advancement or be left behind. The current generation, or those starting with the ones born in the 1980’s had the tech savvy gene inborn (Walkman, CD’s, video games, mp3’s, etc.) and didn’t have as much to develop or didn’t have to take a major leap forward. It’s all similar and connected now. All thumbs is what I say – texting, gaming device controllers, etc. It all comes instinctively now, no training required. PacMan was amazing when it came out. It was a whole new ball game and experience getting your thumbs into action. I don’t like texting, and would rather pick up the phone and call you, but my dad who’s almost 80 loves texting, as does my 15 year old. Go figure. The only thing you need to be tech savvy nowadays is to have money to buy every new technology that hits the shelves, and the gumption and patience to work the gizmo. How many 80 year olds have you seen with iPods and iPhones and computers. Plenty…….

 Do you think certain generations will be left behind, or is there potential for everyone to adapt to technological changes? 

Every technology nowadays is plug and play and easy as pie to use. Cable, mobiles, Internet, you name it, is getting easier everyday.  You no longer have to be a programmer to be able to use computers, or a rocket scientist to understand or use other technology. Companies profit and consumers benefit when everything is easy to use and made for the masses. Mass consumption is the name of the game, and the only way you’ll get left behind is because of you and your reluctance to adapt to changes.

 What’s in store for the future of Mixed Bag? 

This is my baby, my dream, and it’ll be around as long as the listeners are tuning in. I try not to bore my listeners with retreads and based on the stats, so far, so good. A big question mark in keeping this dream alive is the Internet Radio Equality Act that has been seesawing in Congress. The record companies want to raise royalties for hobbyists (such as myself) on Internet radio while giving regular radio all the breaks. If royalties go up, I won’t be able to afford my subscription and I’ll shut down the station. I’ll regret losing my hobby, but darn if I’m going to pay these guys another dime more than I’m shelling out now. The artists, exposure to their music, listeners, and sales will suffer, but to heck with these greedy glut companies. They are already suffering a slowdown in sales, and this is just the beginning of the big wallop the consumers are heaving back at them. Enough is enough!!! I have a closet full of vinyl and cassettes, thousands of CD’s at an average $17 a pop (something that costs $2 to produce) and I say no more. Buzz off. I am a hobbyist doing this for fun, promoting new and older music, not making a dime, not sharing in the sense where listeners can download the tracks, so why rip me off when I’m promoting your product (that I bought) on my hard earned dollar. I buy the music, it’s my time, I pay to be on the bandwidth, promote your product without you compensating me, so where’s the justice in making sure I go silent. A time is coming when more bands like Radiohead will sell their album on an honor system minus the middleman…….coming soon to a website near you!!!! Here’s hoping these corporate suits back off and let us hobbyists do what we do best…….introducing music to the masses on our dollar. If they don’t want the free plug, you know what they can do with it…….

 Check out more from Ajay at http://www.live365.com/stations/djeclectic  

The View From OurAfter

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An Article by John Phillips

http://www.myspace.com/ourafter 

The Overall Music Scene of U.S.A. and Pennsylvania:

The everlasting effects of technology and corporate America have made the musician (or artist) into the one thing that music itself should never become, a consumer product.   While the modern day musician shares his love and passion for allowing the general public to connect with his music and emotion, the modern day influence of music has been watered down into a senseless product that the general public barely has enough comprehension to understand.  Don’t believe me, watch Rockof Love on VH-1.

The true artists of today are the ones to be discovered through the internet and unsigned channels.   Most of the great artists aren’t given a chance due to the fact that their lyrics aren’t on a sixth grade level for your everyday person to understand, or the music riff isn’t the same thing that has been produced one thousand times already However, some scenes are standing out these days has a very eclectic music scene.  Since I have traveled across the U.S.A performing, I have noticed that Pennsylvania is a state that belongs mostly to the Rock, Metal, and Indie scene.

 The cities that stand out the most are Philadelphia, Harrisburg, and the Scranton-Wilkes Barre area.  The thing that I love the most about the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre area is that there is an enormous amount of talent of every type that is literally waiting to explode on a national level.   

Some note worthy bands and acts are Panacea, Spitcan, Dr, Horsemachine and the Moneynotes, Tom Graham, The Let Go, The Five Percent, Ashfall, The Drama Club, Cabinet, George Wesley, Clarence Spady, The Swims, Tigers Jaw, and the list goes on and on!

Even though the economy is faltering in some areas, we continue to work harder and strive towards a bigger picture that we have well within our sights. Check out some of the reviews through publications such as
www.theweekender.com and www.ecweekend.com just to see how much we believe in our area.

Being from Scranton, I have always loved where I live.   I have performed in cover groups, original groups, done concert promoting, etc.  I love being actively involved in sharing great things with my community and exposing them to musical cultures that they normally don’t get to see.  Being the president of the Steamtown Original Music Showcase in my area has proved to be a great asset to also building an ever growing awareness of original music in the N.E.P.A. scene.

My band OurAfter has grown to be a massive force in the Alternative Music Scene in N.E.P.A. and I am very proud of that.  We have performed all across the eastern seaboard and will be expanding even more.   This band will be releasing a new CD due out in Oct of 2008.  The band has found itself in it’s identity, music, emotion, and overall character. The fan base is ever growing and the possibilties are limitless.
Welcome to our world.  You should all come visit us sometime.

John Phillips
OurAfter