The NBT Review 46

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Somewhere Up North – Meet Citizen K (Paraply Records)

Oh there is almost nothing as entrancing than the lonely sound of the trumpet played on the ocean’s (or river’s) edge. The sound sets the scene, the mood, gently takes hold of the emotions and readies us for a personal conversation with the artist.

The singer combines the delicate detachment of the European composer with the intimacy of the New Folk balladeer, sometimes within the same song we are taken from comfortable living rooms, just us and the man and his guitar, and swooped up, flying across vast expanses of territory, long silent roads and majestic mountains.

These are whispered tales of fragile yet dazzling relationships doing harmonic battle with an scratchy cinematic twitch and glare. There are hidden treasures in the details within the words and visceral arrangements. A rare delight is taken in the addition of a piano riff there, an organ twirl here, seductive spoonfuls of colour, dropped in, then mixed perfect, calm, till the result is a sigh and a dream.

This is one of those albums, that while you are listening to it, you want to start all over again as soon as possible, so that you can discover yet another thought, another texture, another revelation.

This independent beauty can be filed along side Grizzly Bear and The Low Anthem as one of the best folk/alt country releases this year.

Find out more here

http://www.paraplyrecords.se/

And listen to tracks from this album on the NBT Podcast

http://nextbigthing.libsyn.com/index.php?post_id=543216

Another Last Call – Doug Folkins (Independent Release)

There is something very Nick Lowe/Dave Edmunds about this new collection from songwriter Folkins, something very good, very pure and very in love with good Pop.

The opening track (and single) Calico Girl drifts from the speakers in a breezy Beatles like harmonica, a subtle uncomplicated tune wrapped around lyrics that penetrate deeper into the psyche than realized.

Comparisons have been made to the folkpunk ‘n’ pop of the Pogues and indeed there is that barroom swagger and glee in a lot of the tracks, which added to the vibrancy of the Levellers at their best, let the tragic edges of human behavior colour murk and heart, light and shade to the bounciest of tunes.

And just when the old time pub songs threaten to get slightly too much for modern rock ears, Folkins craftily adds dollops of blues guitar and tiny tinges of modern Americana to his solid creations  making this a truly international sounding release.

Find out more here

 http://www.dougfolkins.com/

And hear trax from this album on the NBT Podcast

http://nextbigthing.libsyn.com/index.php?post_id=524299

The NBT Review 24

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Trey Green  - Trey Green (El Stormo Productions)

Comedy in rock is a delicate and not usually successful balancing act. At one extreme the content is highly intellectual and/or highly politicized, great stuff for the chin strokers amongst us, but not warm enough for the masses, Or, the artist dumbs down his material, so that it becomes the equivalent of red neck kids dissing each other in the classroom.

1st (quick glance) at the cover and we take in the 50s hair and the cool dark glasses and the working class white T, and we wonder if there will be some kid rock style rock’n’laughter coming our way.

2nd (longer look) at the cover and we see no Illiterate Sneer, no Artless Hyuck-Hyuck, rather a wry self awareness and maybe, yes maybe a smidgen or three of sensitivity.

Time to listen.

The second look proves correct, what we have is a kinder Warren Zevon without the bitterness,  even when singing about what is probably one of the worst girlfriends on pop/Rock song history.

The thing is, the truly captivating thing is, Green is comfortable in the skin of the MUSIC within these song-stories, His band rocks out full and dirty but never leering or sleazy, there are more hooks per ounce than the best crafted Happy Punk missive from  Green Day, just with a total lack of eyeliner angst..YAY..

To this reviewer though, the songs that slip under the soul’s Skin are the serious tales like Last Flight, a haunting missive of some war, some lost fighter pilot and his crew, an epic in 3 minutes.

The gloom doesn’t last too long though, straight after comes a song that seems to have slipped away from a Joe Walsh solo album, mad crush indeed.

There are about 11 potential singles on this 11 track disc.

What are you waiting for? Go check it out.

http://www.treygreenmusic.com/

 

Bix Medard – Bix Medard (independent release)

Sometimes, the darkest place we know lies deep beneath the shiny glowing surface of our perfect pop heart.

The two cover songs in this otherwise wonderfully ‘all originals’ set are a take on the fragile tragic beauty and strength of a Josephine Baker standard, and a cute mischievous capture of a song that enigma and crazy 50s kitten Eartha Kitt brought to the worlds attention.

The drama starts straight away, barely there waves of piano, bass and a skittering scary percussion slide up against the sweet breathy vocalizing and then flute, just escaping from an ancient movie, and then,

the shadows take over.

And how those shadows dance.

These rhythms, these candleFlicker ghosts disturb and seduce, songs of fluid dangerous hours with a partner you are not quite sure of, but very much want to spend the evening with.

This danger is addictive.

Not since Keren Ann’s No-Lita have I been so quietly and completely captured.

Find out more and buy this amazing release here

http://www.myspace.com/bixmedard

http://cdbaby.com/cd/bixmedard

Hear both these Acts on the Ever Eclectic NBT Podcast this Friday 20th March 09

http://nextbigthing.libsyn.com/

 

 

  

 

 

The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 16

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New Media Pioneer: Pete Cogle, one of the podcasters at the Association Of Music Podcasting

Host of  the PC Podcast, featuring eclectic music from around the world: http://pcpodcast.blogsome.com and

The Dub Zone, featuring the very best dub reggae: http://thedubzone.blogsome.com and

PCP{2}, a deeper look into the musical genres explored in PC Podcast: http://pcp2.blogsome.com

 

Plus he is the co-host of

Made In The UK, featuring some of the very best UK music, for the world: http://madeintheukshow.co.uk

AMPed, the weekly digest of the Association of Music Podcasting at: http://musicpodcasting.org

Q: How can a podcaster become a part of Association of Music Podcasting (AMP)?

 

Firstly, you need to have produced at least 5 episodes of your podcast. We want to make sure you don’t “podfade” after your first couple of episodes.  Secondly, all of the music must be podsafe. AMP is about the music that doesn’t get airplay on mainstream radio. Unless artists have specifically made some of their music podsafe, we can’t play it.  We also charge a small membership fee, which helps with hosting and other activities.

 

Most importantly you need to be good at podcasting. Before becoming a member, your podcast will be peer reviewed. We take into consideration the podcaster’s passion about their music, their broadcasting style, the quality of their broadcasting equipment, the quality of the music they play and even the sample rate they create the podcast at.  Not everyone makes the grade.

 

Q: What is the background story on how AMP came about? 

 

AMP’s history goes back to late 2004, long before I joined. Chris MacDonald, Derrick Oien, Bob Goyetche and Jason Evangelho all had important parts to play in setting up the association long before podcasting became a mainstream term.  Back then, Apple was reluctant to accept music podcasts into their iTunes store, because they were worried about licensed music being freely distributed under their umbrella.  AMP became the first association to offer Apple a “safe harbour” knowing that AMP member’s podcasts would be podsafe. AMP was also the first association to offer episodic downloadable media, and start creating a library of music. This library later went on to become a profit-making enterprise as the Podsafe Music Network.

AMP was, and remains, a non-profit making association, and after a hiatus in mid 2005, George Smyth got things moving again. After revamping the website and building some tools to automate the process of making a collective podcast, the AMPed podcast became a weekly event in the podosphere.

I joined the association in March 2006 and have been a regular contributor since then.  Like many new members, initially I just submitted tracks to be played on AMPed, and occasionally became the host.  More recently I’ve taken over a few more duties, like webmaster and membership secretary.  Now many of the members have regular roles maintaining the podcast feed, making sure we all submit music on time, organizing the host rota and hosting the show.  Everyone gets to do as much as they want to do. We’re a good team.

 

The best thing about the association is that we all have a voice. We’ve had some great suggestions from new members and old members alike and we keep moving forward.

 

Q: How do you go about choosing which shows to feature on http://amped.musicpodcasting.org/?

 

Each podcaster can submit a track to AMPed each week.  If everyone submitted a track the show would be 3 hours long, but we generally get enough submissions to fill a 40-60 minute show. It’s entirely up to the podcaster which tracks they want to play, but as they have only one track to chose, it means AMPed ends up being the best of the best. AMPed is also work and child safe.

 

The week’s host is the final arbiter of what tracks make the show, and the running order. All the hosts have a different style and like different kinds of music, so it’s as much of a journey of discovery for them as it is for the listeners. I’m sure some of the hosts groan when I’ve submitted a track sung in Russian or Cambodian, but hey, I like that stuff, and I think the listeners deserve to hear it. You don’t hear that on mainstream radio!

 

Q: How does AMP keep changing?

 

Every new podcaster brings a new perspective on how to promote their podcast and their favourite music. We have members who really understand Search Engine Optimization (SEO), and we’ve completely revamped out website, http://musicpodcasting.org to pull in all the latest information from our member’s blogs and podcasts, straight to our front page.

 

We have other members who are really passionate about social networking, be that via Facebook, Myspace or last.fm.  We’ve recently started using Twitter to publicize when we have new podcasts available, and we’re looking at using Twiturm to “tweet” podcast “samplers” of the shows out to people on the move.

 

We also want to hear what our listeners have to say, so we’ve created a survey on the main page of our website http://musicpodcasting.org. They can tell us what they think of the show, what we do right, and what we should be doing better.

 

 

Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have affected any podcasters being able to air their music?

 

Back in 2004, there were no clear guidelines, but, as I mentioned, Apple were worried about allowing music podcasts into the iTunes store, especially after the legal ruling in the MyMP3.com case.  Because all AMP podcasts were vouched podsafe, this gave Apple the solution they needed and all the AMP member podcasts were approved.

 

Since then, many content laws and broadcasting rights have been suggested, and these vary from country to country. AMP has always been international and we have podcasters based in the US, Canada, UK, Germany, Portugal, Australia and even Nepal, so it’s not easy to see which rules would apply. There are also more stringent rules for streaming services, than there are for podcast downloads, but as long as we keep within our guidelines of using podsafe music, we can continue producing podcasts.

 

Today there are a large number of resources that podcasters can use to get podsafe or Creative Commons licensed music, such as IODA Promonet, Magnatune, Jamendo and Music SUBMIT as well as the Podsafe Music Network, and, of course, Ariel Publicity.  We also get music from other sources such as Myspace, last.fm and from the artists directly, but we do need to make sure the artist, manager, or label gives us permission first. Ariel Publicity is a great service for us, because we know all the hard work has been done beforehand and we can legally play the music.

 

Of course, nowadays everyone knows what a podcast is. When AMP first started, artists were quite unsure of our motives or even what a podcast was.  It’s great to see some of the big artists like, Tom Waits, Bloc Party, Nick Cave or the Manic Street Preachers leading the way and making some tracks podsafe. This encourages up and coming artists to do the same.

 

Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in generating album sales, do you feel that podcasts will have the same effect as well?

 

Absolutely!  I wear a T-shirt that says “Podcasting Is Selling Music” and another one of our members talks about “Promotion Not Piracy”. 

 

Myspace is great for artists to allow listeners to hear their music, but the listener has to go searching if they want to find something new.  If you find a podcast that you like, you can let the podcaster be your guide. We’ve all heard from listeners that they’ve bought an album that they never expected to like because they’ve heard it first on a podcast. 

 

I’ve played bands back in 2006 that none of my friends had heard of, and now they’re playing the main stage of the largest festivals in Europe. OK, that’s not all down to podcasting, but it’s part of the process. Mainstream radio only picks up on bands when they have a major record deal. Podcasters are playing the music months, even years before then.

 

If you want to hear something you’ve heard before by the Beatles or the Eagles, then feel free to go to Myspace or listen to mainstream radio. If you really want to hear something really new; something recorded this year, recorded yesterday, something that’s not even finished yet – then listen to a podcast!

 

 

 

The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 15

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New Media Pioneer: Joel Gaines of the Joel Gaines Show and Internet Radio Magazine

 

Internet Radio Magazine reports on trends happening online in the Internet Radio space. They feature an artist every week.

 

http://www.internetradiomagazine.com

http://www.joelgaineshow.com

http://twitter.com/joelgaines

 

Q: How long have you been broadcasting/blogging?

A: I was a political blogger for 8 years before I became a broadcaster. We’ve been broadcasting The Joel Gaines Show for just over a year. Because of our experience with Ariel Publicity and the artists we’ve interacted with, we have decided to revitalize Internet Radio Magazine dot com as a more music-based property.

Q: In your opinion, what does a good song need to consist of?

A: For me to gravitate to a specific song, I have to feel it. I’m not saying I have to be able to relate to the song topic, but I do have to feel like it’s not contrived. Artists who are investing more than time into a track tend to come across more passionately. That’s what I look for.

Q: What is your favorite band or favorite genre of music and why?

A: I have to admit my favorite genre is 70′s funk and my favorite band is Journey. Having travelled to nearly 30 countries, I have picked up an appreciation for just about everything. Shuffling my music player might find Hazel O’Connor, Crossfade, G Tom Mac, and George Straight played one after the other.

Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have affected you most?

A: I have broadcast under a station license and as an individual internet broadcaster. Trying to stay in license compliance and keeping your music fresh can be price prohibitive for the little guys. I really enjoy the podsafe offering from the fantastic artists Ariel Publicity promotes.

Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in generating album sales, do you feel that that is a true statement?

A: I think it is true. A blogger has more specific opportunities to attract traffic and it is easier to be a big fish in a niche pond. On Myspace, no matter what you are trying promote, you are faced with being just another fish in the ocean. I’ve seen social media work for people when they use it as a means to bring traffic to their blog, but it needs to be looked at more as just another tool in the kit.

 

The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 14

lesbianmafialogo

New Media Pioneer: Sandi of the The Lesbian Mafia Podcast

NYC based lesbian Sandi airs her personal conversations, views, and dirty
laundry, with friends/guests living locally and in other major cities
across the country.

http://thelesbianmafia.podomatic.com/
http://www.myspace.com/thelesbianmafiacast
http://twitter.com/thelesbianmafia

Q:  How long have you been broadcasting?
A:  A year and a half.

Q:  In your opinion, what does a good song need to consist of?
A: I can usually tell if I like a song within the first 10 seconds. It
should be provocative from the second I press play. Tension and release
are really important for me, and good structure makes me feel like I’m
being taken on a ride by the songwriter. Yet sometime’s I think there
really isn’t any magic formula, a good song is just a good song. One
person could love it, another person could hate it, and some songs can
cross over genre’s so it maybe it’s subjective.

Q: What is your favorite band or favorite genre of music and why?
A: I’m not wed to a certain band or genre. At different times I listen to
different styles of music for different reasons. It’s always changing and
I’m always actively on the hunt for new sounds.

Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have affected
you most?
A: The Fairness Doctrine is like a black crow squawking outside the
window threatening death to Freedom of Speech. It’s target is talk radio
but the Internet would logically be their next target. Also the fact that
the music industry treats everyone on the Internet like we are pirates has
created a really unfriendly environment and it’s very unfortunate.
Traditional radio has felt the effects of our media and they are coming
online to get ideas from US to see what WE are doing. They’re trying to
keep up with us because they are the ones who have felt the impact of what
we are doing, a lot of their advertisers are coming online.
One person owns like 1000 radio stations and that is what ruined the music
industry, yet there is still this idea that radio is the only respectable
way to get your music out there. How does it hurt an artist if I am
introducing or reminding my niche audience about their music? Why make it
difficult for us to get your music heard? I don’t have time to seek
everyone out and get their permission to play music. Why create dissension
with people/fans in a unique position to help you?  Guitar Hero has
effectively communicated the right message by charging record labels to
play their artists music in their video games, effectively turning the
tables.

Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in
generating album sales, do you feel podcasts have that power?
A: A lot of musicians have Myspace to thank for their careers. They have
done so much for the music industry. It’s an incredibly effective
marketing tool, but it’s over-saturated. A lot of people have their
Myspace page set to NOT accept band requests. Many people will only add
bands they already like. If I play an artists music on my show, that is
free advertising and the ultimate show of support, because no one is
telling me I have to play it. I think a good portion of  more savvy
attentive people are starting to realize that because I get MP3′s from
musicians pretty often now.

The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 13

ariel20th

New Media Pioneer: Kevin Breuner of the CD Baby Podcast

 

Kevin is a podcaster, blogger, and sync licensing agent.He resides in Portland, OR where he developed and maintains the podcasting and sync licensing efforts for CD Baby.

 

Podcast – http://cdbabypodcast.com

Blog – http://kevinbreuner.com

Twitter – kbreuner

 

Q: How long has the CD Baby Podcast been broadcasting?

 

A: Our first episode of the DIY Musician Podcast posted back in May 2007, so we have been podcasting for a year and a half.

 

Q: What do you try to acheive with each podcast?

 

With each episode, I’m always asking myself, “What can artists learn from this episode. Does this create discussion around topics that are really valuable to the indie music community?” Those questions are bouncing around in my head from the beginning to the end of an episodes production. I think with a podcast or blog, it’s incredibly important to stick to the intended purpose, and because of that, there are interviews that were never released. When it came down to it, they didn’t serve the purpose we want to achieve with the podcast. Ultimately, I hope that each episode continues to empower artists to take their music career into their own hands and make some realistic steps forward.

 

Q: What is the main goal of the CD Baby Podcast?

 

A: My goal with the podcast was to create an “honest” straight forward resource that CD Baby artists and the indie music community at large could use to help move their career forward. I always enjoy talking to other artists and musicians(I’m an artist as well!), and throughout my time at CD Baby, I’ve talked to thousands of artist that are trying to breakthrough with their music. What surprises me, is how many artists, both newbies and seasoned veterans alike, fall into the same traps over and over again.

 

Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have effected you most?

 

A: So far, podcasting has remained relatively untouched. There are quite a few podcasts that play mainstream music (that has not been properly licensed), and I think we’ll start seeing the major labels take an interest in cracking down on the usage of that content. But the beauty of the podcast and the invention of the RSS feed, is that you can have direct access to people who are interested in what you are saying. There is no gate keeper telling you what you can and can’t do.

 

Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in generating album sales, do you feel podcasts have that power?

 

A: I do, and I’m actually surprised that more bands aren’t using podcasting to help promote their music. We actually interviewed a band that released a podcast before they even had all their members. The podcast chronicled their journey as they found the final member and wrote songs, recorded and so on. It immediately caught the attention of the folks over in the iTunes podcast section, and the band’s podcast received a front page feature before they had even played a show. By the time they had all their members and started playing out, people were coming out wearing the bands t-shirts they were selling through their website. The fans really felt a connection to the band. I will say though, for a band to have a podcast that builds their fan base, it must have a couple key components. 1. It must have a point – It can’t be people goofing off in front of a mic or telling inside jokes 2. It must draw the listener into the bands story – Save the shameless self promotion(They probably already are a fan) and give them the real you. 3. It has to be consistent – quite possibly the hardest part. Nobody will be interested in it if you do one episode every couple months. I’m actually in a new band here in Portland, and we have a podcast in the works. We’ve spent so much time really trying to define what it will be and how it will work just to make sure that it becomes a part of what we do. If we just made a random haphazard stab at it, it would be doomed from the beginning.

 

The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 12

arieljan1

New Media Pioneer: Erik Sturm of Bohemio Radio

 

Bohemio Radio is a listener supported radio station for independent artists around the world. They know what it is like for an artist to promote their music, while trying to maintain a creative flow. Now they can express themselves through independent radio without all the hang ups.

 

http://bohemioradio.com

http://myspace.com/bohemioradio.com

 

Q: How long have you been broadcasting?

A: Bohemio Radio has been broadcasting since December of 2007

 

Q: In your opinion, what does a good song need to consist of?

A: A simple melodic progression, accompanied by harmony, rhythm, & soul.

 

Q: What is your favorite band or favorite genre of music and why?

A: I prefer music that has not been scathed by the commercial mainstream. Genres like food keep the menu interesting as all palatable substances have their place in time.

 

Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have affected you most?

A: Performance rights fees and the FCC

 

Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in generating album sales, do you feel podcasts have that power?

A: MySpace is a wonderful platform for marketing; however it requires extended effort from the artist to promote their successes. In a information hungry society with little time or none at all, a podcast can supply you with the extended entertainment at minimal efforts.

 

The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 11

ariel09-c

New Media Pioneer: Andrea Zuniga of Geek is Chic Podcast

http://www.geekischic.org

 

A podcast where technology is fashionable and practical!

 

Q: How long have you been broadcasting?

A: I am very excited to be fast approaching the one year anniversary of my Podcast! The first Episode of Geek Is Chic was released January 31, 2008. I recently just launched a new podcast called Daily Quote Podcast. That one has been in production for almost a month.

 

Q: In your opinion, what does a good song need to consist of?

A: A good song for me captures your attention with a good beat, but is forever engraved into you with lyrics that connect and move you.

 

Q: What is your favorite band or favorite genre of music and why?

A: Although it may sound cliche, I have an incredibly eclectic tastes in music. My iPhone is proof of just that. You can find reggaeton and hip hop, jazz and soul, and really, everything in between. I genuinely feel that there is both good and bad every genre. The important thing is being open minded enough to connect with an amazing song. So I really don’t like to say I have a favorite genre. I love good music, wherever I can find it!

 

Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have effected you most?

A: I think the fact that mainstream artists and the record industry are so protective of the use of their content has for me been a blessing in disguise. I have fallen in love with Podsafe artists. Thanks to fellow podcasters and Ariel Publicity I have discovered some of my favorite new music. The best part is that I can feel free to share with my listeners.

 

Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in generating album sales, do you feel podcasts have that power?

A: I wholeheartedly believe that Podcasts have an incredible power in generating album sales. It has been my personal experience that since I’ve been signing off with music at the end of every show, I ALWAYS get a couple dozen inquiries about the artists I played. I think the reason why it works is quite simple. Since the song recommendation is coming from a trusted source, listeners don’t feel they’re being pitched at. That trust your audience has in you not only makes them take the reccomendation to heart, but since already have a a built in rapport, they feel comfortable enough to ask you where to purchase the music, or find out more about the bands or artist.

 

The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 10

arieldec-fin

New Media Pioneer: Jason Tippitt of Mental Nomad Podcast and Pod Across America

 

http://mentalnomad.libsyn.com/

http://www.myspace.com/mentalnomadshow

 

Mental Nomad Podcast: Eclectic music podcast. I play almost every sort of music, though geared a little more toward singer-songwriters.

 

Pod Across America: Also an eclectic music show, but each episode focuses on one American state at a time.

 

Q: How long have you been broadcasting?

 

A: The Mental Nomad Podcast started in March 2007; it was initially a

twice-a-week show but has been weekly for about a year now, with a few

exceptions. The show’s eclectic, with an intention toward including

music from outside the United States and music from female vocalists

in almost every episode.

 

Pod Across America started in October 2008 and will be two episodes a

month, usually one episode per state. I started in Delaware, the first

state, and will go through Hawaii, the 50th state, in order … a few

states will get two episodes just due to the sheer number of musicians

from those states.

Q: In your opinion, what does a good song need to consist of?

 

A: To me, a good song is one that gives me some sort of emotional

reaction … thrilling to the highs, coasting through the lows,

laughing at a clever turn of phrase or feeling my stomach churn over

some emotional conflict that rings true to me.

 

A song can be really simple and yet really powerful: Bob Dylan’s

“Tomorrow Is a Long Time” and Queen’s “Bijou” are contain very short,

very simple lyrics but the mix of the lyrics, the vocal delivery and

the music turns them into something magical.

 

Most of the music I really enjoy has lyrics, and usually the lyrics

are in English. I do listen to some instrumental music, and I do

listen to some non-English-language music, but the instrumentalists or

vocalists really have to soar above and beyond for me to really engage

the music.

Q: What is your favorite band or favorite genre of music and why?

 

A: Attorney and writer Andrew Vachss has observed that “blues is truth,”

and I agree wholeheartedly. Blues gets down to the core of the human

experience, the raw truth of emotions laid bare. It’s naked and

honest, and even when the blues singer engages in bragging, the

exaggerations point the way toward his or her insecurities.

 

More broadly, music that tells a story is what really gets my

attention. Blues, certainly folk music, certain rap and rock ‘n’ roll,

the cabaret storytelling of a Tom Waits or the deeply emotional jazz

of Jimmy Scott … music with personality.

 

Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc., have

affected you most?

 

A: I feel unqualified to answer this question. I haven’t paid a lot of

attention to the legal issues, whereas I probably should pay more

attention. In early episodes, I was a lot quicker to download a song

from MySpace and play it, then ask permission after the fact. I

wouldn’t dream of doing that now.

 

Using a content provider such as the Podsafe Music Network and working

with publicists such as the folks at Ariel Publicity — where the

music is pre-cleared and podsafe — is the smart way to go, I’ve

found. I’d rather be able to find new music I might not have heard

before and play that than risk getting sued for playing a U2 song that

everyone’s going to hear all over the place, anyway.

 

So the limitations put in place by respecting the law challenges me to

look for the next Bob Dylan, the next Tom Waits, the next Emmylou

Harris.

 

Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in

generating album sales; do you feel podcasts have that power?

 

A: I haven’t personally experienced any huge revenue surge from doing

podcasts and the blogs associated with them, though I do include links

to both the music I play and, to a lesser extent, to the videos that

strike my fancy from artists podsafe and non-podsafe.

 

That said, I have absolutely discovered new music that I’ve

subsequently bought through blogs and podcasts. Blogs and podcasts

offer a great way to sample a lot of music that I wouldn’t hear on

heavily formatted local radio or even the music channels on digital

TV.

 

Podcasts come to you. Blogs come to you, if you syndicate their feeds

through a reader. They require less effort than logging into MySpace

or Facebook, slogging through the many pages of contacts you have, and

noticing when a particular band has updated the profile. So yes, I

think podcasts are a more forward-thinking way of marketing a band –

it’s letting other people be your street team, rather than trusting

people to find you.

 

The CyberPR (Ariel Publicity)New Media Pioneer Interviews 5

New Media Pioneers: Jim and Dave of Boomer Buddies Blog Talk Radio Show 

http://www.blogtalkradio.com/Boomer-Buddies

 

Boomer Buddies Barbershop Banter With Indiana Dave and Jim Two Baby Boomer Practicing Pundits talking about the topics you want to hear about and solving problems our elected officials can’t seem to figure out.

Q: How long have you been broadcasting?

A: Dave and I started what is now Barbershop Banter with Indiana Dave and Jim on BlogTalkRadio in June of this year. We started with the idea that we wanted to support the troops somehow. Dave is a musician and writes and performs songs that are supportive of the troops. He has written several parodies that involve winning this war on terror and also several original songs like his song titled America is my home. We quickly saw that the Bloggers that were the most popular were the ones talking about politics. We fell into that for a short time and made many good friends. Our hearts just weren’t in it for all the mud slinging. For another thing Dave and I are probably complete opposites when it comes to our political views. So we have changed our format to talk about the great job our troops are doing and we also like to feature songs by Independent and unsigned artists. We prefer songs that support the Troops but we play a good variety.

Q: In your opinion, what does a good song need to consist of?

 

A: A good beat that compliments the sentiment of the song, meaningful lyrics and a hook that keeps the song in your head all day.

 

Q: What is your favorite band or favorite genre of music and why?

 

A: Prior to being introduced to Ariel Publicity I would have answered with something like Bob Seger/Classic Rock. Now While I still enjoy the Classic Rock I prefer Alternative, Indie Rock, Indie-Pop and Acoustic Rock, Funk,Folk and Jazz.

 

Q: What changes in content laws, broadcasting rights, etc. have affected you most?

 

A: We are still too new to have realized any changes in this area, we are still learning a lot of the do’s and don’ts

 

Q: A recent study found blogs to be more effective than MySpace in generating album sales; do you feel internet radio has the same power?

 

A: I absolutely do. I think if done properly a blogtalkradio show can create and increase the number of long lasting fans. In the short time Dave and I have been doing this show we have introduced several dozen artists to a group that would not have listened to them otherwise. Our listeners come out to hear Dave and I and as a side benefit they are treated to a variety of GOOD artists that are a breath of fresh air to what they get on the celestial radio. Blogtalkradio has all the benefits of a Blog and A radio show.